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Showing posts from June, 2018

Jefferson Davis's Arrest at Irwinville: The True Story of a Dramatic Episode

Georgia's Landmarks, Memorials and Legends Volume 1
Chapter II Jefferson Davis's Arrest at Irwinville: The True Story of a Dramatic Episode
TWO miles to the west of Irwinville, in what is today a dense thicket of pines, there occurred at the close of the Civil War an incident concerning which a host of writers have produced for commercial purposes an endless amount of fiction. It was here, in the gray morning twilight of May 10, 1865, while encamped on land today the property of Judge J. B. Clement, of Irwinville, that Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, was overtaken by the Fourth Regiment of Michigan Cavalry and put under arrest. More than half a century has elapsed since then; and happily with the flight of time some of the fairy tales of this dramatic period, when the imagination was inflamed by passion, have been dispelled. To prejudice the popular mind against Mr. Davis and to bring upon him speedily the punishment to which he was exposed by rea…

The Christian Conversion of Nathan Bedford Forrest by Dr. Richard Lee Montgomery

The Christian Conversion of Nathan Bedford Forrest by Dr. Richard Lee Montgomery
Fourteen years after Lincoln’s War, on the evening of November 14, 1875, George Tucker “Tuck” Stainback, Pastor of the Court Street Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Memphis, Tennessee, preached the text in Matthew 7:24-27. It was a powerful read, which said, “24Therefore everyone who hears these words of Mine and acts on them, may be compared to a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25"And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and slammed against that house; and yet it did not fall, for it had been founded on the rock. 26"Everyone who hears these words of Mine and does not act on them, will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. 27"The rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and slammed against that house; and it fell–and great was its fall.”1 On that day, guess who was sitting in the pews? Nathan and Mary Ann Forrest.
This powerful text arrest…

Southern Bivouac, September 1882—August 1883, Volume 1: Lee's Retreat

Southern Bivouac, September 1882—August 1883, Volume 1
Lee’s Retreat
Incidents of the Retreat of the Confederate Army to Appomattox—Mahone's Division and its Personal Reminiscences of the March—the Memorable Surrender—a Description by an Officer of the Division—Capt. M'Donald s Narrative.
Following is the interesting paper of Capt. W. N. McDonald, read at the May meeting of the Southern Historical Society. 
It is my purpose this evening to give, from memory, some account of Lee's retreat to Appomattox. No description of the military movements of the different commands will be attempted, but the rambling narrative will deal chiefly in incidents which illustrate the vexations and trials, the hopes and fears, of the masses on that memorable retreat. The command to which I then belonged, Mahone's division, was, at the time of the defeat at Petersburg, stationed along the line of defense from that city to Drury's Bluff, on the James. It may be said, at the outset, that for …

Cyclopedia of Eminent and Representative Men of the Carolinas of the Nineteenth Century, Volume 1: Benjamin Conway Garlington

Cyclopedia of Eminent and Representative Men of the Carolinas of the Nineteenth Century, Volume 1 
Benjamin Conway Garlington
Benjamin Conway Garlington, third son of John and Susan Washington Garlington, was born at Laurens Court House, S. C, November 4, 1836. He received his education at the town academy, at the South Carolina college and the University of Virginia. He graduated in law at the University of Virginia, and was admitted in Columbia, to the courts of South Carolina. While preparing to open a law office in his native town, a call was made by the governor of the state for soldiers to defend her borders from an invading foe; he was among the first to offer himself, and the noble company of "State Guards" of which he was captain. The offer was, of course, accepted, and the "State Guards" became, when mustered into the service of the Confederate states. Company A, Third regiment South Carolina infantry. From the bombardment of Fort Sumter to the battles arou…

A Sermon by George Foster Pierce Augusta, Georgia, March 19th, 1862.

A Sermon  by  George Foster Pierce Augusta, Georgia, March 19th, 1862.
"That he might make thee know, that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live." —Deuteronomy, viii:3.
"The things which were written aforetime, were written for our learning, that we, through patience and comfort of the Scriptures, might have hope." The narratives of the old Testament are not to be regarded as simple paragraphs in general history—mere links connecting, in consecutive order, the events of the olden time, but as embodying great principles in human society and in the divine administration, vital alike to the well-being of the one and the uniformity of the other. God is always the same; and the Bible, while it records the actions of men, is really the history of God, and as "with Him there is neither variableness nor shadow of turning," we learn from His past procedure what we may expect as to His present and f…