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Truths of History: A Fair, Unbiased, Impartial, Unprejudiced and Conscientious Study of History by Mildred Lewis Rutherford

Truths of History: A Fair, Unbiased, Impartial, Unprejudiced and Conscientious Study of History
by 
Mildred Lewis Rutherford

Preface

The histories as now written magnify and exalt the New England colonies, and the Mayflower crew with bare mention of Jamestown Colony, thirteen years older, and the crews of the Susan Constant, the Discovery, and the Goodspeed—the names of these vessels are not even given in most histories. An extended account is always given of the religious faith and practice of the New England Colony, but little or nothing is said of the religious faith and practice of the Jamestown Colony, and no mention of Sir Thomas Dale's Code in the Jamestown Colony—that code which enforced daily attendance upon Divine worship, penalty for absence, penalty for plasphemy, penalty for speaking evil of the Church, and refusing to answer the Catechism, and for neglecting work.

Histories as now written lay great stress upon the industries of the New England colonies, and speak of the South as made up of "a landed aristocracy with slavery as its only excuse for existence." They speak of slavery as a most barbarous institution, and while holding Virginia responsible for introducing slaves into the American colonies, they say nothing of the slave trade and who was responsible for that. They record that William Penn urged the freedom of the slaves, and do not tell that William Penn died a slaveholder. They are careful to tell of the great men of New England, which they should do, but they should not make one believe that they alone were responsible for making the Nation great.

While stressing the prominent part taken by their great men, they fail to tell you that many of them stood for State Sovereignty and the right of Secession as strongly as the South did. They will tell you of the nineteen patriots at Lexington, but overlook entirely the one hundred patriots at Alamance. They will tell you of the Boston Tea Party but ignore the tea parties at Charleston, Annapolis and other Southern ports, and omit the Edenton, (N. C.) tea party where fifty-one patriotic women organized the first patriotic organization for women in the world—"The Daughters of Liberty." 

They will tell you of Otis, Samuel Adams, John Adams and other men of New England, but make no mention of Edmund Pendleton, of Virginia, who first suggested that we should be free of English rule, nor of Thomas Nelson, of Virginia, who read Pendleton's Resolutions in the Virginia Assembly, nor of Richard Henry Lee who was sent to the Continental Congress to present these Resolutions, yet these were the Resolutions that were adopted and resulted in the Declaration of Independence that made us a Nation.

They will not tell you that the Executive, Judicial and Legislative branches of the Government were proposed by a Southern man, and that John Marshall of Virginia settled the relations of these to the Government.

They will tell of the great abolition movement, and extol William Lloyd Garrison, "Wendell Phillips, John G. Whittier, "Walt "Whitman, the Beechers and others, but omit to tell you that "Washington, George Mason, Thomas Jefferson, John Randolph, James Madison, John Monroe, the Lees and others planned to free their slaves and advocated the colonization or the gradual emancipation of all slaves. They will tell you that Abraham Lincoln "broke the shackles that bound the poor slaves," but will not tell you that Abraham Lincoln left the poor slaves in non-seceding states still wearing the shackles, and a Southern man, John Brooks Henderson of Missouri, by the Thirteenth Amendment freed them after Lincoln's death. 

They will tell you that Liberia was bought by a Benevolent Society "to colonize the poor slaves," but will not tell you that a Southern man was the president of that society, and that the capital of Liberia was named Monrovia after James Monroe of Virginia, and protected by the Monroe Doctrine. 

They will tell you of the horrible assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and it was, but say nothing of the far more horrible hanging of Mrs. Surratt, an innocent woman, without judge or jury, upon a false accusation, nor of Dalgren's plan to assassinate Jefferson Davis and his entire Cabinet, and no condemnation followed. 

They tell of the falsehood of history, that Jefferson Davis tried to escape in woman's clothes, and say little of the cowardly disguise of Lincoln in entering "Washington." 

Mildred Lewis Rutherford, Truths of History: A Fair, Unbiased, Impartial, Unprejudiced and Conscientious Study of History. Object: To Secure a Peaceful Settlement of the Many Perplexing Questions Now Causing Contention Between the North and the South (Athens, Georgia, 1920), ii-iii.

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