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Prayers and Other Devotions For the Use of the Soldiers of the Army of the Confederate States

Prayers and Other Devotions For the Use of the Soldiers of the Army of the Confederate States

The Soldier's Prayer in Camp.

O Eternal God, who by Thy unsearchable wisdom, by Thy Almighty power and secret providence, dost determine the issues of human counsels, the events of war and the return of victory and peace, let the light of Thy countenance, and the blessed influence of Thy mercy, be once more shed upon this afflicted land. Pity the evils which we suffer under the power and tyranny of war, and although we acknowledge Thy justice in our sufferings and adore Thee in thy judgments, yet we beseech Thee to hearken to our prayers and provide a remedy for our calamities. Let not the defenders of a righteous cause go away ashamed, nor their counsels be brought to nought. Look with compassion upon our infirmities and remember not our sins, but support us with Thy staff, lift us up with Thy hand, and refresh us with Thy presence. And if a threatening cloud should still overshadow us, illuminate our minds with divine truth that with the eye of faith and hope we may see beyond it; catching a glimpse of those mercies which in Thy secret providence and adorable wisdom Thou mayest still vouchsafe to Thy unworthy servants amidst the saddening scenes and hardships of war. Give us grace and strength diligently to do our duty and cheerfully to submit to Thy will; and as we do put our whole trust and confidence in Thy mercy, and have laid up all our hopes in Thy bosom, let us never be put to shame or confusion before our enemies: but as Thine are the strength and the power, O Lord of Hosts, do Thou make bare Thy mighty arm and give us the victory. Place a guard of angels, O Lord, about the Commander-in-chief, and uphold him with the defense of Thy right hand, that no unhallowed arm may do him violence; support him in all his dangers and trials, and give to all under his orders the spirit of confidence and obedience. Bless all the subordinate officers and confederates under his command. Direct their counsels, govern their actions, unite their hearts and strengthen their hands. Inspire all in the army with ready submission to lawful authority, with a sense of justice and integrity in all their dealings; with courage to resist and overcome the furiousness of our enemies; with compassion to spare the vanquished, and with a ready will to protect the oppressed; that approving themselves to Thee, the Almighty Ruler and Sovereign Disposer of all things, they may receive a full reward for their fidelity and obedience, and, at last, the gift of eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord! Amen.

Prayers and Other Devotions For the Use of the Soldiers of the Army of the Confederate States (Charleston: Evans & Cogswell, Printers, 1861), 5-6.

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